Lemon-Lavender Scone

scone

Sweet scented lavender scone recipe. For those lazy mornings with a cup of Earl Grey tea. 

I first made these for my husband after a trip to southern France. I was inspired by the sweet smells of the lavender harvest in July and find that just a hint of lemon really makes these sing!

If you don’t care for lavender, you’re free to omit this element, but it’s a nice, fresh flavor combination.

 My favorite part of traveling is discovering local traditions and new flavors. When I spent a month in southern France, I became enamored of two things: tea time, and lavender. The French countryside is dotted with purple fields of the herb, and when dried, it makes a fantastic flavoring to add to pastries. 

These Lemon-Lavender scones are slightly sweet, with a hint of nuttiness from the millet flour, and are a great way to honor tea time, or breakfast. 

There are a number of farms within driving distance of my house near Portland Oregon and when I can align my schedule to get out to there during lavender harvest (usually in late July or early August, depending on the weather), I love to spend hours walking up and down the culinary lavender fields with a pair of shears and a basket. Watching the bees flit around, and selecting just the perfect stem is very meditative, and can’t be rushed. Sometimes, though, my schedule is too crazy at the bake shop and I simply can’t set aside all those hours. In that case, I’ll jet down to Barn Owl Nursery in Wilsonville and pick up a pound of dried lavender buds. The bonus is that they have already been shaken off the stem for me! 

Dried lavender keeps for a good amount of time if you keep it sealed in an airtight container in a cool, dark location. I like the back of my coat closet (yes, really!). The amount you’ll need to add will depend on how in bloom the lavender was when it was picked, and how much oil remains in the buds, as well as how much you like the flavor! Too much, and it will taste like soap. 

Lemon Lavender Scones
Serves 18
Subtly sweet lemon-lavender scones are great on lazy days while sipping a cup of Earl Grey tea!
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Scone
  1. 1 cup sweet white rice flour
  2. 1 cup tapioca starch
  3. 1 cup potato starch
  4. 1 cup millet flour
  5. 1 tablespoon Xanthan gum
  6. 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  7. 1 tablespoon baking powder
  8. 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  9. 1 teaspoon salt
  10. 1 tablespoon dried lavender buds
  11. 2 tablespoons finely chopped lemon zest
 (zest from about 2 large lemons)
  12. 3/4 cup butter, cold and diced
  13. 1 cup heavy cream
  14. 1/4 cup lemon juice
Topping
  1. 2 tablespoons cream
  2. 1 tablespoon sanding sugar
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, stir the sweet white rice flour, millet flour, potato starch, tapioca starch, xanthan gum, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt together.
  2. Add the lemon zest and dried lavender and stir to combine. Using a pastry blender, food processor or simply your fingertips, rub the cold butter into the dry ingredients until the mixture resembles coarse pea-sized crumbs. Pour the lemon juice and the heavy cream over the flour mixture and stir to distribute through the dough.
  3. Dough should come together if you squeeze a handful of it, but should not feel excessively wet. Make sure there are no loose dry ingredients at the bottom of the bowl and that everything is well-combined.
  4. Divide dough into 3 equal portions and flatten each portion into a disk about seven inches across by a half inch high. Cut each disk in half and then cut each half into three equal wedges.
  5. Arrange evenly on a baking sheet and brush the top of each scone with a bit of heavy cream. Sprinkle the sanding sugar over the top of the scones.
  6. Bake until the scones are set, about 30-35 minutes. If you gently squeeze the sides of the scone, there should be a little bit of resistance, but should not feel squishy.
  7. Let scones cool on the baking sheet.
Notes
  1. Dried lavender buds (culinary lavender) are available at some supermarkets and natural food stores.
  2. I recommend gluten-free flours from Bob's Red Mill
  3. © Kyra Bussanich
Kyra Bussanich | Life is Sweet! http://kyrabussanich.com/

© Kyra Bussanich